Friday, January 29, 2010

I've Got Sunshine On A Cloudy Day ...

Chinese Sacred Lilies from Brent and Becky's Bulbs

A cold front blew in and brought thunderstorms to my corner of Katy in the wee hours of Friday morning. Although the rain moved on by the time the sun was up, the skies remained cloudy and the temperatures were pretty chilly the rest of the day. It made me very glad I'd allowed some of my bulb-loving fellow bloggers to persuade me I should force some Narcissus inside. One of the great things about this variety is that I should be able to plant them out in the garden and enjoy their blooms again in years to come. I know I should allow their foliage to fade before planting them. My dilemma is whether to store the bulbs inside until next fall and plant them out then, or plant them in a few weeks when it's warmed up. Any Southern gardeners know the answer to that?

6 comments:

Carol said...

I'm not a southern gardener, by a long shot, but I will say that I've never successfully forced narcissus bulbs two years in a row. I've never tried to. I'd be tempted to plant them out in the garden...

Jean said...

I really don't know the answer to that (but would love to). I've planted forced bulbs outside while they still had green leaves and many times they've never bloomed again. Hmm, so maybe that says you should try the other approach and save the bulbs til fall?

Linda/Central Texas Gardener said...

Luscious! I plant mine outside after the foliage browns and that's what Trisha recommends. I'll check with her and see what she thinks about saving them.

Cindy, MCOK said...

I may have to get in touch with Brent & Becky Heath to find out what they think!

Karen Russ said...

Go ahead and plant them outside as soon as possible, with the green leaves still on. Give them some protection w loose pine needles.

Indoor forced bulbs don't get much chance to build up any storage sugars and would be unlikely to survive til next fall if stored inside. Existing leaves, sunlight and real soil outdoors will allow them to start replacing the energy they expended for the forced bloom. It may take them an extra year outside to build back to blooming strength as it is. But worth it, because then, you'll have Chinese Sacred Lilies outside.

Cindy, MCOK said...

Karen, thanks for the information. I'll plant them out when the blooms fade, then. Hopefully when they don't bloom next year, I'll remember what you said about their taking a year off!